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What is mental health at work

Man stressed out at work

Importance of mental health in a workforce

In the current climate of mental illness, it is vital that employers recognize the importance of promoting mental health in the workplace. This could include depression, anxiety, and other conditions that affect the mind and body. A recent Blue Cross Blue Shield of America report indicates that six of the top 10 conditions facing millennials are related to behavioral health.

The study also found that employers who encourage employee mental health are more likely to achieve better employee engagement and productivity outcomes. Employees who feel supported are 26% less likely to report symptoms of mental health and are less likely to underperform or miss work. In addition, they are more likely to feel comfortable sharing personal experiences and seek support. Providing support for mental health at work also leads to greater job satisfaction and a higher retention rate.

Employers should pay close attention to employee mental health and investigate the root causes of such challenges. Once they have that knowledge, they should develop and implement programs to support mental health. Mental health at work is a growing concern for many individuals. Whether an individual is suffering from a mental health condition or simply struggling with stress, it affects their job performance. Fortunately, it can be addressed in the workplace. Employers can implement strategies to improve workplace mental health and create a healthy workplace culture.

Impact on job performance

Mental health at work is a growing concern for many individuals. Whether an individual is suffering from a mental health condition or simply struggling with stress, it affects their job performance. Fortunately, it can be addressed in the workplace. Employers can implement strategies to improve workplace mental health and create a healthy workplace culture.

Mental illness is a widespread problem, with an estimated 264 million people suffering from depression. Many of those individuals also experience anxiety, and these disorders cost the global economy an estimated between £33-£42 billion a year. The financial costs of depression and anxiety are staggering, and they can negatively impact workplace morale, productivity, and retention. 

Employers who support employees have better mental health and engagement outcomes than those that do not. Employees who feel supported are 26% less likely to report symptoms of mental health and are less likely to miss work or underperform. More importantly, they are more likely to feel comfortable talking about their mental health at work. Moreover, employees who feel supported at work have higher job satisfaction and are more likely to stay at the company.


Effects on productivity

Mental health issues can interfere with an employee’s ability to perform at his or her best at work. They can prevent an employee from concentrating on his or her tasks and can also cause problems in their personal lives. These conditions can also lead to high turnover rates, which demoralise the existing workforce and cost the business money in training and recruitment.

Depression is one of the most common mental health problems, affecting about 264 million people worldwide. Many of these sufferers experience anxiety, which makes the condition even more problematic.  It is estimated that if a person suffers from ongoing depression, he or she is 35% less productive than a person who is not depressed. In addition to reduced productivity, mental health disorders can also lead to substance use and harmful behaviors in the workplace. Therefore, it is important for employers to promote a healthy and productive environment.

Studies show that depressed employees have a higher turnover rate than employees who are not depressed. According to one study, employees suffering from depression lost 15% of their jobs, while non-depressed workers lost only 3.5%. However, most of these depressed employees don’t seek treatment because of the stigma surrounding mental health. In fact, 72% of employers believe that stigma around mental health prevents employees from seeking treatment. Furthermore, an employee suffering from anxiety disorder will miss an average of 5.5 days at work each month, which negatively affects productivity.

Tools for improving mental health

There are a wide variety of tools for improving mental health at work. These resources can help employers better understand and support the well-being of their workers. These resources include case studies, assessment tools, and best practices in mental health care. Employers should make mental health information accessible to all employees, and promote mental health professionals and programs within their workplaces.

Digital mental health tools are a growing trend for employers who are looking for additional ways to improve their employees’ well-being. Many of these tools offer a range of approaches and offerings, and some have been shown to be just as effective as in-person therapy. Employers can also utilize these tools as a supplement to existing treatments offered at affordable costs.

Several studies have shown that employees who receive poor mental health support at work are more likely to resign. Furthermore, according to Gallup research, there’s an increase in the incidence of negative emotions such as sadness and anger at work. Additionally, 47% of employees who disclose a mental health problem in the workplace experience negative consequences.

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